Nima Dilmaghani’s Technology Blog

The tools folks said they used at Alt.net Conference

At the Alt.net conference Someone put a sheet on the wall and folks filled it out with:

here is a flickr link to the photo of the first page and here is what was on the sheet:

Update:  AltNetPedia has this list in much better order now.

What tools do you use?
Resharper
NUnit
NHibernate
Castle
Reflctor
Subversion
MbUnit
Bugzilla
Visual Studio!
TestDriven.NET
PowerShell
CodeRush
Fiddler
CharlesWebProxy
FogBugz
Jira
Confluence
Fisheye
Big Witeboard Wall!
Mono
Reboot
CruiseControl.net
Rhino Mocks
MS Test
TFS
Team Build
Mac Book
Firebug
Structure Map
Textmate for C# (Really!)
e
Autotest
Active Record Migrations
NAntMy Generation
VMWare
perl
Visual SVN
Socket Wrench
Scredrive
Eclipse
Java
Groovy
JUnit
Gurce

Fitnesse
Rake
NUnitForms
iBatis
Index Cards
WORM
NDepend
FXCop
Putty
Baseball Bat
Simian
Ruby
Watir
NetBeans
Subversion
Selenium
Fiddler
MSBuild
Excel
.NET
Media Wiki
OS X!
Synergy (network KVM)
Tortoise SVN
jQuerry
Hammer
DPack
GreatEX
Subsonic
NCover
NCoverExplorer
SQL Server
Mingle
Git
Vim/ViEMU
Emacs
Trac
Firefox
Cygwin
Grep
Skype
Acrobat Connect
Trillian
Outlook
SQL Diff
Google
(o)(o)
CI Factory
Ethernal
Caffeine
SQL Compare
MANTIS
ADIUM
NotePad
XML Doc Viewer
Fire
Lots of e
Manipulation
Beer
Cross Loop
YUI
WinMerge
Pandora
Parallels

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The curse and the gift of BarCampBolck

As I am writing this, BarCampBlock is starting in Palo Alto. I will be attending remotely from the East Coast and dearly miss my friends and colleagues who will be there.

BarCamp started two years ago as an ad-hoc gathering of technologists mainly interested in the web. BarCamp is free and open to everyone. It is also a un-conference and very loosely structured. Over the last two years, with the explosion of bubble 2.0 and the rise in popularity, stature, and influence of BarCamp’s two main promoters, Tara Hunt and Chris Messina, BarCamp has become a focal point of the Web2.0 community. Fortunately or unfortunately, human nature, particularly in the Western European practice of human nature, requires one to always out do oneself. So Tara and Chris came up with the brilliant idea of holding BarCamp’s second anniversary event as a block party. For a block party to be successful, you need lots of people. For an un-conference to be successful, you need at the very most 250 people (see Tim O’Reilly comment here). However, the human need to out do yourself and to celebrate success in the grandest way possible is always tugging at you as you make your decisions. So Tara and Chris went on doing what they do very well, promoting and promoting BarCampBlock. With blog posts from TechCrunch and Robert Scoble, it was obvious that BarCampBlock will be huge. And it is, over 900 people are coming to BarCampBlock! The question that will be answered over the next two days is how effective an un-conference will this be? No doubt it will be lots of fun. But will the connections, relations, and collaborations that come out of smaller un-conferences happen at BarCampBlock? While I am sitting some 3,000 miles away, I am eager to find out how this new direction for BarCamp will play out.